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Industry Updates

HUD MAP Guide – Key Radon Measurement and Mitigation Updates

The HUD Office of Multifamily Housing Programs has released its updated Multifamily Accelerated Processing (MAP) Guide. Released on December 18, 2020, the guidance goes into effect on March 18, 2021. Key updates to radon measurement and mitigation requirements include:

  • Section 9.6.3.2.C – the previous guidance permitted the radon professional to conclude that testing or mitigation isn’t necessarily based on a physical inspection of the property, the characteristics of the buildings, and other valid justifications. The updated guidance requires a valid justification for requesting exemption of testing or mitigation, based on criteria detailed in the applicable ANSI/AARST standard, to be provided by the radon professional in the form of a signed letter.
  • Section 9.6.3.2.C – the previous guidance excluded testing and mitigation for Section 223(f) projects located in Zone 3 of the EPA’s Map of Radon Zones. The updated guidance removes this exclusion, requiring testing and mitigation for all Section 223(f) projects.
  • Section 9.6.3.2.D – the previous guidance permitted random screening of 25% of ground contact units in each building in lieu of the full 100% characterization required by the measurement standard. The updated guidance removes this deviation, requiring radon testing to be conducted in full compliance with the ANSI/AARST measurement standard, which includes 100% testing of ground contact units in each building.
  • Section 9.6.3.2.G – the previous guidance permitted a ‘worst-case’ estimate for mitigation to be conducted as a non-critical repair. The updated guidance requires the lender to include a firm scope of work and all related costs for mitigation in the Firm application. In order to provide the firm scope of work and all related costs for mitigation, the pilot test and building evaluation will need to be treated as a critical repair.
  • Section 9.6.3.2.I – the previous guidance provided general parameters for the ongoing operation, maintenance, and monitoring (OMM) requirements when a mitigation system is installed at a property. The updated guidance requires an OMM program meeting the requirements of the ANSI/AARST mitigation standard to be maintained at a property containing a mitigation system for the duration of the insured mortgage. The OMM plan must be submitted to HUD upon completion of the mitigation project.
  • Section 9.6.3.2.J – the previous guidance did not include a provision for ensuring existing mitigation systems at a property are functioning correctly and meet the minimum requirements of the mitigation standard. The updated guidance requires existing mitigation systems at a property to be evaluated by a radon professional to confirm compliance with the ANSI/AARST mitigation standard and to verify they are functioning correctly. If applicable, corrective action must be taken by a radon professional to address any deficiencies with the mitigation systems.
  • Section 9.6.3.2.K – the previous guidance permitted a ‘worst-case’ cost estimate for mitigation and did not require inclusion of ongoing OMM costs. The updated guidance requires the lender to provide a firm scope of work and all related mitigation costs, to include ongoing OMM costs, in the Firm application.

For loans where the Firm application is submitted prior to the effective date, the lender must choose whether the 2016 or 2020 version of the MAP Guide will be utilized, stating this choice in the application. The lender may not mix underwriting provisions from both guides during the 90-day transition period.

The updated guidance is being implemented as we work to overcome the radon measurement and mitigation challenges created by the COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 measurement and mitigation guidance released by HUD’s Office of Multifamily Housing Programs on April 2, 2020 remains in effect. Check out our April 3, 2020 update on this guidance.

The updated guidance is specific to projects being processed under the MAP Guide. We anticipate similar radon measurement and mitigation guidance for projects being processed under the Office of Residential Care Facilities Section 232 Handbook in the future. The COVID-19 measurement and mitigation guidance released by ORCF on April 10, 2020 remains in effect. Check out our April 10, 2020 update on this guidance.

As always, the trusted professionals at Protect Environmental stand ready to assist you in determining the most efficient and economical approach for managing radon and chemical vapor intrusion. As the largest provider of radon measurement and mitigation services to HUD lenders, you can rely on our knowledge and expertise to provide flexible options to ensure your transactions continue to move forward in a timely and cost-effective manner. Follow our LinkedIn portal for timely updates related to the rollout of HUD’s updated MAP Guide.

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Press Releases

Kyle Hoylman Named President of the American Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists

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Industry association members elect seasoned veteran to lead organization during important time of tremendous opportunity and growth

Louisville, KY, November 16, 2020 – Protect Environmental announced today the election of Kyle Hoylman, its Managing Partner, to serve as president of the American Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists (AARST). The announcement comes after the annual meeting of the association held during the 2020 International Radon Symposium. As president of the organization, Hoylman will work with the AARST staff and board of directors to continue the implementation of the strategic plan of the organization. He will immediately assume the position, serving for a period of two years.

“I’m humbled by the vote of confidence from my industry colleagues to lead the organization during this important time of tremendous opportunity and growth,” said Hoylman. “I look forward to continuing the work of AARST in preventing radon-induced lung cancer and saving lives through increasing public awareness, raising industry professionalism, and supporting effective radon policy,” he added.

Hoylman brings over 15 years of experience in the radon and chemical vapor intrusion industry, serving as Managing Partner of Protect Environmental. Under his leadership, the company has grown into one of the largest environmental consulting and construction firms focusing on radon and chemical vapor intrusion in the country. He has been heavily involved within the AARST organization over the past decade, including serving on its board of directors, where he chaired the government affairs committee. He also chairs the executive stakeholder committee of the AARST Consortium on National Radon Standards, which oversees the ANSI/AARST national consensus radon standards recommended by the US EPA.

About Protect Environmental

Protect Environmental is a leader in the environmental consulting and construction industry, focusing on radon and chemical vapor intrusion management. With a proven track record spanning 15 years and more than 5,900 completed projects across the country, the company provides expert service from its trusted professionals to provide peace of mind protection to property owners seeking efficient and effective management of environmental risks and liabilities. For more information, call 502-410-5000 or click on to https://www.protectenvironmental.com.

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Industry Updates

Indiana Adopts Emergency Rule for Radon Measurement and Mitigation

Effective July 8, 2020, the Indiana State Department of Health has promulgated an emergency rule updating its radon measurement and mitigation requirements. The rule significantly impacts multifamily and residential care lending transactions being processed through HUD, Fannie Mae, and Freddie Mac. Key points of the emergency rule include:

  • as a condition of licensure, radon contractors are required to maintain certification through a proficiency program recognized by the EPA.
  • all measurement, mitigation, and QA/QC activities must be conducted in accordance with the applicable AARST/ANSI standard.
  • a non-licensed person may only perform measurement and/or mitigation on a building that they own and occupy.

If you have a project located in Indiana, consider working with our company to ensure you are in compliance with this emergency radon rule. With a proven track record spanning 15 years and more than 5,900 completed projects across the country, Protect Environmental provides expert service from its trusted professionals to provide peace of mind protection to property owners seeking efficient and effective management of environmental risks and liabilities. For more information about putting our expertise to work for you, contact us today or give us a call at 502-410-5000.

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Blog

The Reaction to Coronavirus Exposure vs Radon Exposure

The coronavirus has significantly impacted the lives of Kentuckians over the past several months. Major events have been canceled. Schools have been closed. Business has come to a grinding halt. The terms ‘quarantine’ and ‘social-distancing’ have become common. We even receive daily updates from our governor regarding our ongoing response to this public health emergency. To be certain, the changes to our daily lives have been sudden and drastic, all caused by a silent killer – the coronavirus. 

The similarities between radon, a cancer-causing, radioactive gas found in hazardous concentrations in almost 50% of all Kentucky buildings, and the coronavirus are striking. Both involve public health. Both have taken the lives of hundreds of Kentuckians this year.  Both have created enormous economic burdens. Both are silent killers. And both can be prevented by avoiding exposure. The difference in how Kentucky has responded to the coronavirus versus how it has responded to radon is also striking, which begs to question, “What if Kentucky responded to radon like it’s responding to the coronavirus?”

If Kentucky responded to radon like it’s responding to the coronavirus, swift action would be taken by our policymakers to mitigate exposure to radon. Buildings where we learn, work, and play would be monitored to ensure occupants aren’t unknowingly being exposed to unsafe concentrations of radon gas. And when unsafe concentrations of radon are identified, a mitigation system would be installed on the building to effectively manage occupant exposure. Persons buying a home would be empowered to make an informed decision regarding radon in their new home through effective notification and disclosure policies. Newly constructed buildings would include a passive ventilation system for more efficient and economical management of radon intrusion and require testing prior to occupancy. The result of implementing common-sense radon policy would be healthier, safer buildings where occupants aren’t being unknowingly exposed to cancer-causing, radioactive radon gas.    

The response to the coronavirus in our state proves our policymakers are capable of acting quickly. Why haven’t these same policymakers reacted as quickly to the ongoing pandemic caused by radon? Exposure to radon claims the lives of approximately 500 Kentuckians every year. Losing a loved one to a preventable disease has a tragic impact on Kentucky families. The financial burden created by the nearly $200 million dollars in direct and indirect costs caused by radon-induced lung cancer each year is alarming. Yet, our policymakers continue to ignore the unnecessary deaths and financial burden caused by this terrible disease.    

To be certain, if Kentucky responded to radon like it’s responding to the coronavirus, the impact on preventing radon-induced lung cancer and the number of lives saved would be significant. Maybe the question we should be asking is, “Why isn’t Kentucky responding to radon like it’s responding to the coronavirus?”  

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Blog

Radon in Military Housing

U.S. Service members and their families living in housing owned and operated by the government are at risk for exposure to hazardous concentrations of cancer-causing, radioactive radon gas, as detailed in a recent report released by the Department of Defense (DoD) Office of Inspector General (OIG).

The report concludes: If the DoD and the Services do not improve policies and procedures to identify, mitigate or minimize, monitor, disclose, and oversee health and safety hazards in GO‑GC military housing, the DoD and the Services will continue to risk the health and safety of Service members and their families. 

U.S. Service members and their families living in housing owned and operated by the government are at risk for exposure to hazardous concentrations of cancer-causing, radioactive radon gas, as detailed in a recent report released by the Department of Defense (DoD) Office of Inspector General (OIG).

Evaluation Background

Radon is a naturally occurring, odorless, colorless radioactive gas formed by the decay of uranium. Radon exists in varying amounts in all soils, rocks, and some groundwater supplies worldwide. Radon enters the lungs when inhaled and chronic exposure may lead to lung cancer. Exposure to radon is the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers (second overall to smoking) and is responsible for more than 21,000 annual deaths in the United States. Radon poses a relatively low threat to human health outdoors; however, radon can accumulate to dangerous levels indoors. The presence of high levels of uranium in the soil or rock is not the sole reason for elevated indoor radon potential. Building design, building usage, building construction material, airflow, occupancy pattern, and the operation of the building’s heating, ventilation, and air‑conditioning system influence the accumulation of radon indoors. Testing for radon is the only way to determine if radon hazards are present in GO‑GC military housing.

Released on May 4, the report details the findings of the evaluation, which was conducted to determine if the DoD is effectively managing health and safety hazards, including radon, in GO-GC military housing. Currently, more than 38,000 GO-GC military housing units are owned, managed, or maintained by the DoD worldwide.

Government‑Owned and Government‑Controlled Military Family Housing
052820-DOD-OIG-Tables-01-1

Eight military installations containing approximately 15,525 (41 percent of total) GO-GC housing units were included in the evaluation:

  • U.S. Army Garrison (USAG) Humphreys, Republic of Korea
  • USAG Wiesbaden, Germany
  • Naval Station (NAVSTA) Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
  • Commander Fleet Activities (CFA) Yokosuka, Japan
  • Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Iwakuni, Japan
  • Kadena Air Base (AB), Japan
  • Spangdahlem AB, Germany
  • Wright‑Patterson Air Force Base (AFB), Dayton, Ohio

The evaluation included:

  • A review of records, health and safety hazard management plans, policies and procedures, and health and safety hazard assessment and testing results to determine whether installation officials identified potential hazards and were implementing the requirements for the management of health and safety hazards in GO‑GC military housing.
  • Interviews with installation officials from housing, operations and maintenance, engineering, environmental, fire, safety, and health departments to determine their knowledge of applicable health and safety management requirements and their efforts to manage health and safety hazards in GO‑GC military housing.
  • A visual assessment of a selection of 187 GO‑GC military housing units to determine if health and safety hazards were effectively managed in GO‑GC military housing.

The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) of 1976 assigns regulatory and program implementation responsibilities to federal agencies, such as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), to control substances determined to cause unreasonable risk to public health or the environment. The TSCA currently covers the control of highly toxic substances, including radon. For purposes of the evaluation, the HUD’s Healthy Homes Program Manual for best practices and techniques to achieve a healthy home was utilized. Based on the OIG’s review of health and safety hazards described in the manual and observations from previous DoD OIG reports, the management of nine potential health and safety hazards, including radon, were included in the evaluation.

Evaluation Findings for Radon

At each of the eight military installations evaluated, systemic deficiencies in the management of health and safety hazards in GO-GC military housing were identified. Specific to radon, the following findings were noted:

  • Installation Officials Did Not Establish a Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program – the evaluation determined that installation officials at USAG Humphreys, USAG Wiesbaden, and NAVSTA Guantanamo Bay did not establish a radon assessment and mitigation program for GO‑GC military housing. The report summarizes: Installation officials at USAG Humphreys, USAG Wiesbaden, and NAVSTA Guantanamo Bay could not determine the extent that radon hazards were present in GO‑GC military housing. Without establishing a radon assessment and mitigation program, installation officials cannot manage radon hazards, and residents may have been exposed to radon hazards in GO‑GC military housing.
  • Installation Officials Established a Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program but Did Not Manage Radon Hazards – the evaluation determined that installation officials at CFA Yokosuka, MCAS Iwakuni, Spangdahlem AB, and Kadena AB were not evaluating hazards, controlling hazards, or informing residents of the presence of radon. The report summarizes: Installation officials are unable to identify the extent that radon hazards were present in GO‑GC military housing because installation officials did not evaluate and control radon hazards. Therefore, residents may have been exposed to radon hazards in GO‑GC military housing. Furthermore, without installation officials informing residents of radon hazards, residents may not be aware of the potential health effects of radon exposure.
Radon Hazard Management Program Summary by Installation

Report Recommendations for Radon

In response to the evaluation findings, the following recommendations were made in the report:
  • Establish or revise appropriate DoD policies to address health and safety hazards, including radon, in military housing to manage health, safety, and environmental risks to acceptable levels for military housing residents.
  • Revise Army Regulation 420‑1, Chief of Naval Operations Instruction 5009.1, Marine Corps Order 11000.22, Air Force Instruction 32‑6001, and all other housing‑related policies to align with recommended DoD policy revisions.
  • Develop oversight policies and procedures to assess the management of health and safety hazards in GO‑GC military housing.
  • Direct installation officials to correct the specific radon health and safety hazard management deficiencies discussed in the report.

Our Analysis

Radon is the most significant environmental health risk present in GO-GC military housing. Unfortunately, installation officials could not determine the extent that radon hazards were present in GO-GC military housing at seven of the eight installations included in the evaluation, and residents may have been exposed to hazardous radon concentrations in these GO-GC military housing units.

As stated in the report, radon assessments were conducted in the 1990s at military installations worldwide by the Services in response to the TSCA requirement. Most likely, these assessments have never been updated, reinforcing the position that installation officials cannot determine the extent of radon hazards present today in GO-GC military housing, and residents may be exposed to hazardous radon concentrations in GO-GC military housing units. Because geological conditions change and renovations may be conducted that may significantly modify the building envelope and mechanical systems, the current consensus radon standards recommended by the EPA specify all buildings be assessed for radon a minimum of one time every five years (every two years in buildings under active mitigation).

The guidance contained within the Army policy (AR 420‑1), the Navy policy (OPNAVINST 5090.1D, also covering Marine Corps installations), and the Air Force policy (AFI 48‑148) requires the implementation of a radon assessment and mitigation program. However, this guidance appears to be outdated or fails to incorporate requirements for radon contractors working on GO-GC military housing to be certified through a proficiency program recognized by the EPA or follow current consensus radon standards.  

In contrast, Section 3061 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 applies to privatized military housing units, which constitute more than 99 percent of military housing in the continental United States. This Act requires an ongoing radon assessment and mitigation program to be implemented for all privatized military housing that includes radon measurement and mitigation activities be conducted by a radon contractor certified by a proficiency program recognized by the EPA following the consensus radon standards recommended by the agency.

In our opinion, adoption of the same requirements being utilized for privatized military housing should also be adopted for GO-GC military housing. After all, why shouldn’t Service members and their families living in GO-GC military housing be provided with the same protection against cancer-causing, radioactive radon as those living in privatized military housing?     

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Industry Updates

HUD Releases Residential Care Facility Radon Testing Guidance in Response to Coronavirus (COVID-19) Emergency

The HUD Office of Residential Care Facilities has released guidance for radon testing during the COVID-19 emergencyReleased on April 10, the guidance contained within Mortgagee Letter 20-10 is effective immediately and reads: 

Regarding asbestos surveys and radon testing: In situations where interior access to the subject is limited and the asbestos survey (if applicable) and/or radon testing cannot be completed prior to application submittal, ORCF will require a Firm Commitment condition requiring the asbestos survey and/or radon testing (and any required mitigation to be identified) prior to closing. Such radon testing must test 100% of the ground level units/rooms and 10% of the upper floor units/rooms in all buildings included in the project.

The guidance provides flexibility for managing radon testing in situations where interior access to the subject property is limited. Because radon testing requires separate mobilizations for device placement and retrieval, the ability to submit applications without the radon report helps to ensure transactions don’t become stalled. However, when utilizing this option, testing of 100% of ground contact locations (and 10% of upper floor locations) is necessary and HUD will require a condition to be added to the Firm Condition requiring testing to be completed before closing.   

Radon mitigation, when required, must also be identified prior to closing. When testing is conducted after the Firm Commitment, completion of the pilot test needed to determine the firm non-critical repair budget for closing may create timing challenges. We recommend completing the required radon testing as soon as interior access is made available to the facility to prevent the potential for delays in the lending transaction when the need for radon mitigation is identified.  

As always, the trusted professionals at Protect Environmental stand ready to assist you in determining the most efficient and economical approach for managing radon and chemical vapor intrusion. During the COVID-19 emergency, you can rely on our expertise to provide flexible options to ensure your transactions continue to move forward – follow our LinkedIn portal for timely updates and information while this situation continues to evolve.

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Industry Updates

HUD Releases Multifamily Radon Testing Guidance in Response to Coronavirus (COVID-19) Emergency

The HUD Office of Multifamily Housing Programs has released guidance for radon testing during the COVID-19 emergencyReleased on April 2, the guidance is effective immediately and reads:

For MF FHA-insured lending, in situations where interior access to the subject property is limited, and the asbestos surveys, lead-based paint hazard evaluations, and/or radon testing cannot be completed prior to application submittal, MFH Production will allow lenders to submit applications without these reports. However, MFH Production will require these reports before issuing a Firm Commitment. For new construction and substantial rehabilitation properties where asbestos clearance sampling, lead clearance examinations, or radon testing takes place after construction, all mitigation reports, including follow-up sampling, examinations, or testing, must be submitted to HUD staff at the final completion inspection, before occupancy.

The guidance provides flexibility for managing radon testing in situations where interior access to the subject property is limited. Because radon testing requires separate mobilizations for device placement and retrieval, and typically includes all ground contact locations (and a percentage of upper floor locations) at the property, being able to submit applications without the radon report helps ensure transactions don’t become stalled. However, HUD does require testing to be completed before issuing the Firm Commitment.

Radon mitigation, when required, is not specifically addressed in the guidance. In most instances, completion of the pilot test needed to determine the firm non-critical repair budget for closing will not be feasible. When applicable, we anticipate HUD will permit flexibility in providing a ‘worst-case’ budget for mitigation to ensure transactions can close.  

As always, the trusted professionals at Protect Environmental stand ready to assist you in determining the most efficient and economical approach for managing radon and chemical vapor intrusion. During the COVID-19 emergency, you can rely on our expertise to provide flexible options to ensure your transactions continue to move forward – follow our LinkedIn portal for timely updates and information while this situation continues to evolve. For LEAN transactions, we anticipate guidance from ORCF to be released soon for radon testing in residential care facilities during the COVID-19 emergency.

HUD-Update-2020-featured-image
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Press Releases

Chemical Vapor Intrusion Expert Joins Protect Environmental to Lead Products Team

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With a diverse background in scientific academia, manufacturing, and the environmental industry, Dr. Chris Bonniwell to head product portfolio focused on radon and chemical vapor intrusion management

Louisville, KY, March 10, 2020 – Protect Environmental announced today the addition of Chris Bonniwell, Ph.D. as Director of Products. Dr. Bonniwell joins Protect Environmental after approximately 10 years in the environmental consulting industry in Indiana and Wisconsin, which were preceded by four years as an environmental regulator at the Indiana Department of Environmental Management and seven years managing an industrial manufacturing company in Wisconsin. During his tenure as an environmental regulator and consultant, Dr. Bonniwell provided technical oversight to hundreds of projects in the assessment and remediation of environmental impacts from metals, petroleum compounds, PCBs, and chlorinated solvents. Dr. Bonniwell is a licensed professional geologist in Wisconsin and Indiana, with a consulting career heavily focused on projects with complex chemical vapor intrusion issues, a field in which he is considered a subject matter expert.

As the Director of Products, Dr. Bonniwell will be responsible for managing the product portfolio of the company, including the development, production, and marketing of products for use in the assessment, mitigation, and ongoing management of radon and chemical vapor intrusion contaminated properties. These products include the Vapor Sentinel Remote Environmental Monitoring System, which was awarded patent protection in January of 2020 (press release). The addition of Dr. Bonniwell will include the establishment of an office in the Greater Milwaukee area (Cedarburg) to bolster the company’s presence in the upper Midwest.

“Having firsthand experience with the technical expertise and cost effectiveness Protect Environmental delivers to its clients, I am excited to be joining the team,” Dr. Bonniwell said. “I look forward to working to deliver products and solutions that directly impact the health and well-being of so many,” he added.

“Attracting someone with the background in scientific academia, manufacturing, and environmental consulting Dr. Bonniwell possesses is a real coup for our company,” said Kyle Hoylman, Managing Partner of Protect Environmental. “Chris is widely regarded in the industry as an expert in chemical vapor intrusion, which makes him a natural fit to champion our products portfolio,” Hoylman added.

About Protect Environmental

Protect Environmental is a leader in the environmental consulting and construction industry, focusing on radon and chemical vapor intrusion management. With a proven track record spanning 15 years and more than 5,900 completed projects across the country, the company provides expert service from its trusted professionals to provide peace of mind protection to property owners seeking efficient and effective management of environmental risks and liabilities. For more information, call 502-410-5000 or click on to www.protectenvironmental.com.

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Press Releases

Protect Environmental Receives Patent on Environmental Remote Monitoring System

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Vapor Sentinel Remote Monitoring System provides more efficient and effective solution for meeting long-term stewardship and continuing obligations on contaminated radon and chemical vapor intrusion sites

Louisville, KY, January 29, 2020 – Protect Environmental announced today issuance of the official patent on its environmental remote monitoring system. The system, known as Vapor Sentinel, is now available to monitor and optimize vapor mitigation systems installed on radon and chemical vapor intrusion contaminated sites.

The traditional approach to meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining landowner liability defenses on contaminated sites is costly and provides minimal assurances that building occupants are safe from exposure to radioactive radon and toxic chemicals. On average, mitigation systems are verified to be functioning correctly only one time each year, and contaminants of concern may only be confirmed to be below the applicable exposure limit one time every few years. This approach creates liability management challenges for the responsible party and makes obtaining and managing site closure difficult, if not impossible. In fact, most contaminated sites never achieve site closure, costing the responsible party hundreds of thousands of dollars, if not millions, to meet ongoing long-term stewardship obligations.

The Vapor Sentinel Environmental Remote Monitoring System tracks the ongoing operation of vapor mitigation systems, providing 24/7/365 real-time monitoring to verify system functionality and confirm building occupants are safe from exposure to vapor intrusion. The system effectively addresses the liability management challenges associated with the traditional approach while providing a pathway to site closure that benefits the responsible party and provides peace of mind to building occupants. Likewise, the system facilitates redevelopment of contaminated sites by providing a cost-effective option to satisfy continuing obligations of the new owner or tenant.

Environmental monitoring and mitigation is a multibillion-dollar market. As of 2017, the U.S. EPA and its partners reported overseeing approximately 640,000 to 1,319,100 facilities to prevent releases into communities. However, no single comprehensive data source tracks the full extent of contaminated land in the United States. 

“After many years in the product development cycle, we’re excited to be delivering a better, more protective solution to our clients to manage the significant liability associated with radon and chemical vapor intrusion contaminated sites,” said Kyle Hoylman, Managing Partner at Protect Environmental. 

“The Vapor Sentinel Environmental Remote Monitoring System is a game-changer for our clients seeking to gain closure on contaminated sites and to help satisfy continuing obligations to maintain CERCLA liability defenses,” said David Gillay, Partner at Barnes & Thornburg and head of the Remediation, Redevelopment, and Environmental Transaction practice groups for the firm.

Key features of the system include: 24/7/365 real-time monitoring, user-defined condition notifications, secure cloud-based data storage, reliable wireless connectivity, convenient client portal access, instant historical data access, customized automated reporting, durable weathertight enclosure, quick and easy installation, and proprietary patented technology. Full specifications for the system can be found at protectenvironmental.com.

About Protect Environmental

Protect Environmental is a leader in the environmental consulting and construction industry, focusing on radon and chemical vapor intrusion management. With a proven track record spanning 15 years and more than 5,900 completed projects across the country, the company provides expert service from its trusted professionals to provide peace of mind protection to property owners seeking efficient and effective management of environmental risks and liabilities. For more information, call 502-410-5000 or click on to https://www.protectenvironmental.com.